Archive for January, 2017

YJC Priorities For L.A. Sheriffs Department Civilian Oversight

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

 

The Youth Justice Coalition recommends ESTABLISHMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THESE ESSENTIAL POWERS FOR OVERSIGHT OF THE L.A. SHERIFFS DEPARTMENT:

1. POWER TO ESTABLISH POLICY FOR THE DEPARTMENT

2. POWER TO REVIEW AND FINALIZE THE LASD BUDGET THAT IS PRESENTED TO THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. SPENDING DETERMINES PROGRAM AND POLICY PRIORITIES.

3. CREATE AND MAINTAIN A NEW, FAIR, TRANSPARENT, ACCESSIBLE AND INDEPENDEDNT COMPLAINT PROCESS FOR THE LASD – BOTH IN COMMUITIES AND IN CUSTODY, INCLUDING HAVING THE OIG AND THE SYSBIL BRAND COMMISSION WORK FOR AND REPORT TO THE OVERSIGHT COMMISSION.

4. ADOPT THE FAMILY RIGHTS PLATFORM GOVERNING TREAMENT OF VICTIMS’ FAMILIES AFTER USE OF FORCE:

GUARANTEE LOS ANGELES COUNTY FAMILIES THESE RIGHTS
AFTER LAW ENFORCEMENT USE OF FORCE

Establish these rights for all families – (to address community and family concerns) immediately after law enforcement use of force resulting in homicide or severe injury:

1. Maintain fairness and withhold judgment. After an incident, do not discredit the victim, their family or community. Give the same answer when people ask about the possible misconduct or excessive use of force by members of law enforcement – “We can not comment because the incident is under investigation.” (Often, law enforcement claims the …

Sign On to Letter for Strong Regulations on Racial and Identity Profiling Data Collection

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

SIGN ON TO LETTER FOR STRONG REGULATIONS TO END RACIAL & IDENTITY PROFILING BY LAW ENFORCEMENT IN CALIFORNIA
RESPONSE TO DRAFT REGULATIONS GOVERNING DATA COLLECTION CREATED BY THE STATE RACIAL AND IDENTITY PROFILING ADVISORY BOARD CREATED BY AB 953

Please sign on your organization, school/university or house of worship to the letter below that will be sent to the Department of Justice. This letter reflects the recommendations raised by the YJC and other community organizations at the recent public hearing and in calls we had to engage the community.

TO SIGN ON: reply to this email or send a message to action@youth4justice.org

Read the entire letter at below at www.youth4justice.org. These regulations if adopted will govern the data that law enforcement agencies across the state have to document during a stop – whether the stop is of a vehicle or on the street, in schools and colleges, on public transportation, in public housing, apartment buildings and private homes:

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January 25, 2017

Catherine Z. Ysrael
Deputy Attorney General
Civil Rights Enforcement Section California Office of the Attorney General 300 South Spring Street, First Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Kathleen V. Radez
Deputy Attorney General California Department of Justice Civil

First 100 Days Under Trump – Day 2, 1/21/17 – Erasing Civil Rights, Expanding Police and Vigilante Rights

Monday, January 23rd, 2017
Today’s Report: Trump Administration’s “Law and Order” Policing Priorities
 
The Youth Justice Coalition has been monitoring the threats of Donald Trump, his advisors and appointees regarding what his administration will mean for youth and community criminalization, policing, incarceration and deportation.
 
Early on, several of his advisors and potential cabinet members have said that a top goal of the new administration should be to prioritize for deportation “anyone who is designated a gang member” and anyone “who has been arrested.” Given how easy it is to be designated a gang member by law enforcement in California – usually without any charges or arrest – and how inaccurate and unaccountable these databases have been proven to be – (revealed through community organizing and now through a state audit of CalGang that we were able to get last year) – we have been working with groups across the state to try and eliminate federal access to gang databases. This has included working on Senate Bill 54 (Senator DeLeon) to include that federal access to California databases cannot be used for immigration purposes. This effort, however, may be mostly symbolic given federal law enforcement’s multiple relationships and opportunities to work closely with local and