Let’s PASS Prop 57 in CA!

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THINGS YOU CAN DO TO PASS PROP 57 ON NOVEMBER 8TH

REGISTER PEOPLE TO VOTE.
The last day to register for the fall election is October 24th.
 

You can pick up voter registration forms from your local post office or public library. To request 50 or more voter registration cards, contact the Secretary of State, via mail or fax to: California Secretary of State, Elections Division, 1500 11th Street, 5th Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814 / Fax: (916) 653-3214.

The Secretary of State’s Elections Division is supposed to process the request within 48 hours of receiving the form. For additional assistance, please contact the Secretary of State’s Elections Division at (916) 657-2166.

REGISTER PEOPLE ONLINE TO SPEED  UP THE PROCESS:
Click here to access the online application > registertovote.ca.gov/

People need to re-register to vote when: they move to a new permanent residence, they change their name, or they change their political party choice.  Re-register here >  www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-registration/  To find out if someone is currently registered to vote, visit > www.sos.ca.gov/elections/registration-status/ to check their voter registration status.

If the person is enrolled in California’s confidential address program (for people who are in a secret and/or secure location) – “SAFE AT HOME” – do not apply to register to vote using the regular site. Contact the Safe At Home program toll-free at (877) 322-5227.

To get trained in voter registration or if you have any questions, contact the Secretary of State’s Elections Division at (800) 345-8683.

EDUCATE YOUR COMMUNITY ABOUT PROP 57 by making presentations at your local churches, synagogues, mosques and temples; passing out materials at your job and school; outreaching to people at court, on the jail and prison visiting lines, in parks, etc.; and/or attending or organizing community events.  Everywhere you go, you can both register people to vote and hook them up with Yes on 57 materials. Start a YES ON PROP 57 team to lead the effort in your community.

GET OUT THE VOTE.

Contact us at action@youth4justice.org to connect with the Get Out the Vote effort in your area.  People are needed to go door-to-door and make calls in the weeks leading up to the election and on Election Day.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 8th.   VOTE EARLY:

People can vote by mail.

The last day to request a Vote-By-Mail Ballot is November 1, 2016.

This is also how people inside lock-ups must vote unless you can arrange for a voting booth with your local County Registrar’s office – which can happen but almost never does.  The voting rights for people who are locked up or on Parole are included below.

Return Vote-by-Mail Ballots with a postmark no later than November 8, 2016.

The last day for the state to receive a Vote-By-Mail Ballot postmarked on or before November 8 is November 11, 2016

For people who are eligible to vote, but are outside the country – including US citizens who are members of the uniformed services (on active duty) and their family members, members of the Merchant Marines and their family members, commissioned corps of the Public Health Service, commissioned corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or US citizens living outside the United States – apply to register to vote, receive your elections materials, and vote, through a special absentee ballot by filling out the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) available here >  www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-registration/

GET OUT THE JAIL VOTE.

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REGISTER AND VOTE IF:  

  • You are or will be 18 on November 8th, 2016.
  • You were born in the U.S. or are a naturalized citizen.
  • You have NOT been found by a court to be “mentally incompetent.”
  • You CAN vote if you are currently detained in a juvenile hall or county jail going back and forth to trial.
  • You CAN vote if you are currently incarcerated on misdemeanor charges in a County Jail, state prison, Probation camp or ranch or any other lock-up. (Legal Services for Prisoners with Children are also working to expand rights to people serving time in county jail on a felony – especially impactful given all the people serving AB109 sentences.)
  • You CAN vote if you have been convicted in the past, as long as you have completed Parole.
  • You CAN vote if you are on either formal, informal or AB 109 Probation.

    We all need to fight to expand voting rights
    for all people regardless of their incarceration, immigration or Parole status, and to lower the voting age to at least 16.  For more information on the current rights of people who have been incarcerated, see the Secretary of State’s Voting Rights for Californians with Criminl Convictions or Detained in Jail or Prisonwww.sos.ca.gov/elections/voting-resources/new-voters/who-can-vote-california/voting-rights-californians/

    For additional information regarding voting rights, and to complain about discrimination go to Voter Bill of Rights > 
    www.sos.ca.gov/elections/voter-bill-rights/


PROPOSITION 57: 

(1) Ends the power of prosecutors to transfer youth as young as 14 into Adult Court without a hearing before a juvenile court judge. Youth will be guaranteed a hearing in juvenile court, and the burden will fall on prosecutors to prove why a youth would be better served by adult court.

(2) Permits parole for people who are incarcerated in state prison with a “nonviolent*” conviction.  Prop 57 makes people eligible for parole consideration if they are convicted of a “nonviolent offense,” and have completed the sentence for their primary offense. The parole board maintains discretion to prevent release for anyone they consider a risk to public safety. (*We understand that many offenses labeled as “violent” are not, and we also want all people – regardless of their charges – to have the right to work toward release, and believe that extreme sentences – including Life Without Parole and other extreme sentences – deserve sentence reconsideration.  Prop 57 doesn’t do everything.  We have to commit to organize for opportunities for all.

(3) Provides incentives for incarcerated people to complete rehabilitative programs inside.
People who avoid disciplinary write-ups, maintain positive behavior, and complete rehabilitative programs, such as counseling, education and job training, can earn additional credits toward their release. Currently, California sentencing laws prevent the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation CDCR will determine eligibility and will adopt regulations.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 8th.  We have 56 more days to pass Prop 57.
We will sharing information every day to help California get out every vote.

GO TO THE YES ON PROP 57 FACEBOOK PAGE for more information on Prop 57; to see a calendar of events; to get support in creating your own Yes on 57 actions; to schedule a presentation; to get materials; and to get updates on the campaign.

IF WE WORK TOGETHER TO PASS PROP 57 WE CAN BUILD A SAFER, FAIRER, HEALTHIER AND HAPPIER STATE.

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